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Pro-Freedom/Anti-Prohibition Groups.

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The ACLU has been one of America's most tireless advocates of civil rights, regardless of the politics of the people involved. They've gone to war in the courts to protect minority rights and KKK parades alike. The ACLU flatly opposes prohibition of drugs as an unethical and unconstitutional social policy.

The Cato Institute. This conservative/libertarian think tank never met a socialist or welfare recipient they liked, and are outspokenly opposed to drug prohibition as unsound public policy.

 

The Drug Policy Alliance is one of the slicker anti-prohibition advocacy groups, providing information on drugs, news, legal developments and more.

The Drug Reform Coordination Network is an anti-prohibition advocate and a major clearinghouse for news and developments in the US government's war on the American people.

The Center for Cognitive Liberty and Ethics believes that you have an absolute right to be free within your own mind, including the right to take or refuse psychoactive drugs.

The Libertarians: "We're against all regulation!" Well, not quite, but the Libertarians are passionate advocates of personal freedom and personal responsibility. Opposition to US drug policy is part of their official party platform. While I have serious philosophical objections to some of their ideas, they aren't kidding about their slogan: The Libertarians really are the only American political party with explicitly articulated and consistently upheld principles (vs. just a collection of political stances depending on the polling numbers.)

NORML

The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws is one of the granddaddies of anti-prohibition activism, leading medical marijuana and other initiatives, including ad campaigns. NORML embraces the radical, extremist position that responsible marijuana use by consenting adults in their own homes isn't any of the government's damn business.

NORML
LEAP is an advocacy group of former and current law enforcement personnel who work to inform the public about prohibition's failure and call for reform of US drug laws.